Sunday, 21 June 2015

[] 11 Things Smart People Won’t Say



There are some things you simply never want to say at work.

These phrases carry special power: they have an uncanny ability to make you look bad even when the words are true.

Worst of all, there's no taking them back once they slip out.

I'm not talking about shocking slips of the tongue, off-color jokes, or politically incorrect faux pas. These aren't the only ways to make yourself look bad.

Often it's the subtle remarks—the ones that paint us as incompetent and unconfident—that do the most damage.

No matter how talented you are or what you've accomplished, there are certain phrases that instantly change the way people see you and can forever cast you in a negative light. These phrases are so loaded with negative implications that they undermine careers in short order.

How many of these career killers have you heard around the office lately?

1. "It's not fair"

Everyone knows that life isn't fair. Saying it's not fair suggests that you think life is supposed to be fair, which makes you look immature and naïve.

If you don't want to make yourself look bad, you need to stick to the facts, stay constructive, and leave your interpretation out of it. For instance, you could say, "I noticed that you assigned Ann that big project I was hoping for. Would you mind telling me what went into that decision? I'd like to know why you thought I wasn't a good fit, so that I can work on improving those skills."

2. "This is the way it's always been done"

Technology-fueled change is happening so fast that even a six-month-old process could be outdated. Saying this is the way it's always been done not only makes you sound lazy and resistant to change, but it could make your boss wonder why you haven't tried to improve things on your own. If you really are doing things the way they've always been done, there's almost certainly a better way.

3. "No problem"

When someone asks you to do something or thanks you for doing something, and you tell them no problem, you're implying that their request should have been a problem. This makes people feel as though they've imposed upon you.

What you want to do instead is to show people that you're happy to do your job. Say something like "It was my pleasure" or "I'll be happy to take care of that." It's a subtle difference in language, but one that has a huge impact on people.

4. "I think …/This may be a silly idea …/I'm going to ask a stupid question"

These overly passive phrases instantly erode your credibility. Even if you follow these phrases with a great idea, they suggest that you lack confidence, which makes the people you're speaking to lose confidence in you.

Don't be your own worst critic. If you're not confident in what you're saying, no one else will be either. And, if you really don't know something, say, "I don't have that information right now, but I'll find out and get right back to you."

5. "This will only take a minute"

Saying that something only takes a minute undermines your skills and gives the impression that you rush through tasks. Unless you're literally going to complete the task in 60 seconds, feel free to say that it won't take long, but don't make it sound as though the task can be completed any sooner than it can actually be finished.

6. "I'll try"

Just like the word think, try sounds tentative and suggests that you lack confidence in your ability to execute the task. Take full ownership of your capabilities. If you're asked to do something, either commit to doing it or offer an alternative, but don't say that you'll try because it sounds like you won't try all that hard.

7. "He's lazy/incompetent/a jerk"

There is no upside to making a disparaging remark about a colleague. If your remark is accurate, everybody already knows it, so there's no need to point it out. If your remark is inaccurate, you're the one who ends up looking like a jerk.

There will always be rude or incompetent people in any workplace, and chances are that everyone knows who they are. If you don't have the power to help them improve or to fire them, then you have nothing to gain by broadcasting their ineptitude. Announcing your colleague's incompetence comes across as an insecure attempt to make you look better. Your callousness will inevitably come back to haunt you in the form of your coworkers' negative opinions of you.

8. "That's not in my job description"

This often sarcastic phrase makes you sound as though you're only willing to do the bare minimum required to keep getting a paycheck, which is a bad thing if you like job security.

If your boss asks you to do something that you feel is inappropriate for your position (as opposed to morally or ethically inappropriate), the best move is to complete the task eagerly. Later, schedule a conversation with your boss to discuss your role in the company and whether your job description needs an update. This ensures that you avoid looking petty. It also enables you and your boss to develop a long-term understanding of what you should and shouldn't be doing.

9. "It's not my fault"

It's never a good idea to cast blame. Be accountable. If you had any role—no matter how small—in whatever went wrong, own it. If not, offer an objective, dispassionate explanation of what happened. Stick to the facts, and let your boss and colleagues draw their own conclusions about who's to blame.

The moment you start pointing fingers is the moment people start seeing you as someone who lacks accountability for their actions. This makes people nervous. Some will avoid working with you altogether, and others will strike first and blame you when something goes wrong.

10. "I can't"

I can't is it's not my fault's twisted sister. People don't like to hear I can't because they think it means I won't. Saying I can't suggests that you're not willing to do what it takes to get the job done.

If you really can't do something because you truly lack the necessary skills, you need to offer an alternative solution. Instead of saying what you can't do, say what you can do. For example, instead of saying "I can't stay late tonight," say "I can come in early tomorrow morning. Will that work?" Instead of "I can't run those numbers," say "I don't yet know how to run that type of analysis. Is there someone who can show me so that I can do it on my own next time?"

11. "I hate this job"

The last thing anyone wants to hear at work is someone complaining about how much they hate their job. Doing so labels you as a negative person and brings down the morale of the group. Bosses are quick to catch on to naysayers who drag down morale, and they know that there are always enthusiastic replacements waiting just around the corner.

Bringing it all together

Eliminating these phrases from your vocabulary pays dividends. They have a tendency to sneak up on you, so you're going to have to catch yourself until you've solidified the habit of not saying them.

What other phrases should be on this list? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.


Dr. Travis Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the #1 bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world's leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, 

Junaid Tahir

Fun & Info @ Fun & Info @ Fun & Info @ Fun & Info @ Fun & Info @ Fun & Info @



Posted by: Junaid Tahir <>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (1)
KERALITES - A moderated eGroup exclusively for Keralites...

To subscribe send a mail to
Send your posts to
Send your suggestions to

To unsubscribe send a mail to




[] 25 Things That Will Better Your Odds Against Alzheimer's


 25 Things You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's  

Alzheimer's strikes fear in all of us. The thought of losing your mind as you grow older is terrifying and made worse by the fact that, before now, there appeared to be little we could do to slow down or avoid Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia.

Fun & Info @

Today, research has found many factors that raise or diminish the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Following these tips, you could slash your chances of developing the disease:

1. Check out your ankle
Low blood flow in your foot is a clue to trouble in your brain and a simple test can reveal its cognitive state and your likelihood of stroke and dementia. The theory is that the health of your blood vessels is similar throughout the body. The degree of clogged arteries and blood flow in the feet can suggest atherosclerosis in cerebral blood vessels. Ask your doctor for an ankle-brachial index (ABI) test which involves an ultrasound device and a blood pressure cuff that compares blood pressure in your ankle with that in your arm. To remedy any impairment of blood flow your GP may advise stepped-up exercise or a change in diet/medication.


Fun & Info @

2. Antioxidant-rich foods
Certain foods infuse your brain with antioxidants that can slow memory decline and help prevent Alzheimer's. All fruit and vegetables are good but top of the list are black raspberries, elderberries, raisins and blueberries.



3. Beware of bad fats
The type of fat you eat changes your brain's functioning for better or worse. Stay away from saturated fats which strangle brain cells causing them to become inefficient. Buy low fat or fat-free dairy products including milk, cheese and ice cream. Cut down on deep-fried foods.

4. Chocolate Treat
Cocoa, the main ingredient in chocolate, has sky-high concentrations of antioxidants called flavanols, which possess strong heart and brain-protecting properties. Drinking cocoa increases blood flow to the brain. Cocoa powder has twice as many flavanols as dark chocolate which has twice a many as milk chocolate. White chocolate has zero. 

5. Grow a bigger brain
Your brain starts to shrink when you reach 30 or 40 so it takes longer to learn. However scientists now believe you can increase the size of your brain through the act of learning. Try studying, learning new things or broadening your circle of friends for stimulation. 



6. The Estrogen Evidence
Sixty eight per cent of Alzheimer's patients are women, possibly as midway through life they lose the protection of the hormone estrogen which boosts memory. Unless your GP says otherwise, start taking estrogen immediately at the time of menopause – starting any later risks dementia and strokes.

7. Raise good cholesterol
It's well known that having high good-type HDL blood cholesterol protects you from heart disease. But it can also save your brain. Researchers claim it blocks sticky stuff that destroys brain cells and acts as an anti-inflammatory to lessen brain damage. Ways to ramp up good cholesterol include exercise, drinking moderate amounts of alcohol and losing weight.

8. Google something
Doing an internet search can stimulate ageing brains even more than reading a book.
And MRI scans show that savvy surfers have twice as many sparks of brain activity as novices. Go online to search for information, things to buy or games to play. Although it's not known how much it will benefit your brain, it's better than passive pursuits.

9. The ApoE4 gene
Fun & Info @
One in four of you reading this has a specific genetic time bomb that makes you 3 to 10 times more susceptible to developing late-onset Alzheimer's. The gene is called apolipoprotein E4. If you inherit a single variant of ApoE4 from one parent, your Alzheimer's risk triples. If you inherit a double dose from both parents, your risk rises by 10 times. Ask your doctor about a DNA test to reveal your ApoE4 genotype.



10. Say yes to coffee
Coffee is emerging as a tonic for the ageing brain. It is anti-inflammatory, helps block the ill effects of cholesterol in the brain and cuts the risks of stroke, depression and diabetes, all promoters of dementia. It is also high in antioxidants and caffeine which stop neuronal death and lessen diabetes, high blood pressure and strokes that bring on dementia. For most people, a moderate daily intake of coffee, two to four cups, won't hurt and may help.

11. Dangers of underweight
Unexplained weight loss after age 60 or so may be a sign of Alzheimer's. A study showed that women with the disease started losing weight at least 10 years before dementia was diagnosed. Among women of equal weight, those who went on to develop dementia slowly became thinner over three decades and, when diagnosed, weighed an average 12lb less that women who were free of Alzheimer's. Talk to your doctor about unexplained weight loss after 60.

12. Drink wine
A daily glass of wine may help delay dementia. Research says that alcohol is an anti-inflammatory and raises good cholesterol which helps ward off dementia. High antioxidants in red wine give it additional anti-dementia clout. Such antioxidants act as artery relaxants, dilating blood vessels and increasing blood flow which encourages cognitive functioning. 

13. Know the early signs
Memory problems are not the first clue. You may notice a decline in depth perception, for example you reach to pick up a glass of water and miss it. Or you misjudge the distance in walking across a street. 

Doing a jigsaw puzzle or reading a map may also be confusing. Losing your sense of smell can also be an early clue, as well as asking the same question repeatedly or misplacing belongings in odd places (like putting keys in the fridge). Be aware of memory problems as the earlier the signs are spotted, the more successful lifestyle changes and medications are likely to be.

14. A Mediterranean diet
The Mediterranean diet, no matter where you live, can help save your brain from memory deterioration and dementia. Studies consistently find that what the Greeks and Italians eat is truly brain food. Following this diet – rich in green leafy vegetables, fish, fruits, nuts, legumes, olive oil and a little vino – can cut your chances of Alzheimer's by nearly half. Rather than depending on just one food or a few nutrients, it is a rich menu of many complex brain benefactors, including an array of antioxidants, which shield brain cells from oxidative damage.


15. Middle Age Obesity

Your brain cares if you are fat. A study showed obese people had 8% less brain tissue and overweight people had 4% less brain tissue than people of average  weight, which according to some scientists hugely increases the risk of Alzheimer's. Moreover, brain shrinkage occurred in areas of the brain targeted by Alzheimer's, and which are critical for planning, long-term memory, attention and executive functions, and control of movement.

Tackle signs of rising weight early, when you are young or middle-aged. Oddly, being obese after the age of 70 does not raise the risk of Alzheimer's but that doesn't mean you should neglect exercise as it is the best way of stimulating cognitive functioning and may delay the onset of Alzheimer's at any age.

16. Get a good night's sleep
A lack of sleep is toxic to brain cells. Sleep has surprising powers to protect your brain against memory loss and Alzheimer's. It is a wonder drug that helps manipulate levels of the dreaded brain toxin peptide beta-amyloid, a prime instigator of Alzheimer's, which according to one scientist puts you at accelerated risk. Research has also found that sleeping an average of five hours or less a night is linked to large increases in dangerous visceral abdominal fat, which can cause diabetes and obesity that can lead to Alzheimer's. Take naps and seek treatment for sleep disorders.

May also interest you:

  • A Few Health Tips to Keep You In Good Shape!
  • Advice From a Nutritionist - Excellent Help!
  • 8 Substances Your Body Needs to Absorb Every Single Day
17. Have an extended social circle
Studying the brain of a highly sociable 90-year-old woman who died from Alzheimer's, researchers in Chicago found that having a large social network provided her with strong "cognitive reserve" that enabled her brain to not realize she had Alzheimer's. Why this happens is a mystery but interacting with friends and family seems to make the brain more efficient. It finds alternative routes of communication to bypass broken connections left by Alzheimer's. So see friends and family often and expand your social network. The stronger the brain reserve you build through life, the more likely you are to stave off Alzheimer's symptoms.

18. Deal with stress
When you are under stress, your body pours out hormones called corticosteroids, which can save you in a crisis. But persistent stress reactions triggered by everyday events like work frustration, traffic and financial worries can be dangerous. Over time, it can destroy brain cells and suppress the growth of new ones, actually shrinking your brain. Sudden traumatic events like the death of a loved one or a life-changing event like retirement can leave a hangover of severe psychological stress that precedes dementia. Be aware that chronic stress can increase older people's vulnerability to memory decline and dementia. Seek professional advice. Antidepressants, counselling, relaxation techniques and other forms of therapy may head off stress-related memory loss if treated early. 

19. Take care of your teeth
Fun & Info @ 
Bad gums may poison your brain. People with tooth and gum disease tend to scorelower in memory and  cognition tests, according to US dental researchers who found that infection responsible for gum disease gives off inflammatory byproducts that travel to areas of the brain involved in memory loss.

Consequently, brushing, flossing and preventing gum disease may help keep your gums and teeth healthy but also your memory sharper. In another study, older people with the most severe gingivitis – inflamed gums – were two to three times more likely to show signs of impaired memory and cognition than those with the least.


20. Get enough Vitamin B12
As you age, blood levels of vitamin B12 go down and the chance of Alzheimer's goes up. Your ability to absorb it from foods diminishes in middle age, setting the stage for brain degeneration years later. Researchers at Oxford University found that a brain running low on B12 actually shrinks and a shortage can lead to brain atrophy by ripping away, myelin, a fatty protective sheath around neurons. It can also trigger inflammation, another destroyer of brain cells. Take 500 to 1000mcg of vitamin B12 daily after the age of 40. If you or an older family member has unexplained memory loss, fatigue or signs of dementia, be sure to get tested for vitamin B12 deficiency by your GP.

21. Vinegar in everything
There is plenty of evidence that  vinegar sinks risk factors that may lead to memory decline, namely high blood sugar, insulin resistance, diabetes and pre-diabetes and weight gain. Researchers in Phoenix, Arizona, have noted in studies of humans and animals that the acidic stuff packs potent glucose-lowering effects. Studies have also found it can curb appetite and food intake, helping prevent weight gain and obesity, which are associated with diabetes, accelerated dementia and memory loss. Pour on the vinegar – add it to salad dressings, eat it by the spoonful, even mix it into a glass of drinking water. Any type of vinegar works.

22. Have your eyes checked
If you preserve good or excellent vision as you age, your chances of developing dementia drop by an astonishing 63%. And if it's poor, just visiting an optician for an eye test and possible treatment at least once in later life cuts your dementia odds by about the same amount. Exactly how vision problems promote dementia is not clear but impaired vision makes it difficult to participate in mental and physical activities such as reading and exercising, as well as social activities, all believed to delay cognitive decline. Be aware that your eyes reflect and influence how your brain is functioning, especially as you age. Don't tolerate poor vision as often it can be corrected.

23. Eat curry or take curcumin pills
Curry powder contains the yellow-orange spice turmeric, packed withcurcumin, a component reported to stall memory decline. One study showed elderly Indians who ate even modest amounts of curry did better in cognitive tests. Curcumin works by blocking the build-up of Alzheimer's-inducing amyloid plaques (deposits found in the brains of sufferers) then nibbles away at existing plaques to slow cognitive decline.
It is recommended to eat two or three curries a week, and make it a yellow curry. Otherwise, sprinkle the spices on your food. Read more about the many benefits of Curcumin.

24. diabetes control
Having type 2 diabetes makes you more vulnerable to Alzheimer's. Studies show it may double or triple your risk and the earlier diabetes takes hold, the higher the odds of dementia. Some experts refer to Alzheimer's as "diabetes of the brain". The two disorders have similar causes – obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fat and high sugar diets, low physical activity as well as high blood sugar. In short, diabetes can deliver a double whammy to the brain, destroying neurons and increasing inflammation. Do everything possible to keep blood sugar levels low and stick to a low-saturated-fat diet and regular exercise.



Fun & Info @

25. Drink more tea
Evidence suggests that tea stalls the cognitive loss that precedes Alzheimer's and that the more tea you drink, the sharper your ageing memory is. Tea's secret is no mystery. The leaves are packed with compounds able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and block neuronal damage. 
One particular green tea antioxidant can block the toxicity of beta-amyloid, which kills brain cells. Make a point of drinking black and green tea. Don't add milk, it can reduce tea's antioxidant activity by 25%.


Posted by: Murli dhar Gupta <>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (1)
KERALITES - A moderated eGroup exclusively for Keralites...

To subscribe send a mail to
Send your posts to
Send your suggestions to

To unsubscribe send a mail to




[] Brushing Your Teeth Is Good For Your Heart [2 Attachments]


How could your dental and heart health ever be connected? Well, according to new research conducted in England, there is a rather strong connection between the ways you care for your pearly whites and your chance of suffering a heart attack.
Fun & Info @
The study, conducted by the Scottish Health Survey, examined over 11,000 individuals of all ages to identify a possible correlation between dental and heart health. Along with information on their dental bill of health, the subjects were asked to provide information about their other lifestyle habits, such as smoking, physical activity, and health routines.
Of the group, about 62 percent said they visited the dentist every six months, and another 71 percent said that they brushed their teeth twice a day. This information lead the researchers to conclude that those that admitted to brushing their teeth less frequently had an extra 70 percent risk of heart disease or heart attack.
"Our results confirmed and further strengthened the suggested association between oral hygiene and the risk of cardiovascular disease," says Richard Watt DDS from the University College London. According to the researchers, the results of the study were not entirely surprising, but rather confirmation of a decade-long hypothesis on the connection between dental diseases and cardiovascular health.
In yet another study conducted in the United States, it was found that as people's gum health decreased, so did the rate at which plaque built up in their arteries. This study showed that the chances of contracting a dangerous condition called atherosclerosis, or the narrowing of the arteries around the heart, decreased when subjects brushed their teeth and had a clean bill of gum and oral health.
Fun & Info @

But scientifically, how are gum disease and heart disease connected? The bacteria that develops in your mouth when you have gum disease contributes to atherosclerosis in that it adds to the level of inflammation of the arteries and triggering a biological reaction that narrows space these important passage ways. Once you have atherosclerosis, your chances mild to certain that you will experience a heart attack and possibly even stroke.
So the next time you worry about your visit to the dentist, or need a reason to floss your teeth, remember that caring for your oral and gum health properly could dramatically decrease your chances of heart disease and other serious conditions. Make brushing and flossing a regular habit, and you are sure to be on the way to a heart-healthy and happy self!

View attachments on the web

Posted by: Fereshteh Jamshidi <>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (1)

Check out the automatic photo album with 2 photo(s) from this topic.
teeth_brushing_good_01.jpg teeth_brushing_good_02.jpg

KERALITES - A moderated eGroup exclusively for Keralites...

To subscribe send a mail to
Send your posts to
Send your suggestions to

To unsubscribe send a mail to